Information sur la source

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Certificats de décès de Rzeszów Judenrat, Rzeszów, Pologne, 1939 à 1945 (USHMM) [base de données en ligne]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2022.

This collection was indexed by World Memory Project contributors from the digitized holdings of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, RG-15.641: Rada Żydowska Rzeszów (Sygn. 272) , For more information about this collection, click on the collection title above to access the USHMM’s catalog record, or email [email protected]

The World Memory Project is part of the Ancestry.com World Archives Project - a community collaborative effort that allows thousands of people around the world to help preserve history that would otherwise be lost. Click here to see additional World Memory Project collections.


Données originales :

Rada Żydowska Rzeszów (Sygn. 272). Series RG-15.641. The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington D.C.

 Certificats de décès de Rzeszów Judenrat, Rzeszów, Pologne, 1939 à 1945 (USHMM)

Cette base de données contient des détails extraits des certificats de décès délivrés par le Judenrat de Rzeszów.

About this collection

This database contains details extracted from death certificates issued by the Judenrat in Rzeszów. The original records are held by the Żydowski Instytut Historyczny im. Emanuela Ringelbluma (Emanuel Ringelblum Jewish Historical Institute) in Poland.

Historical Background

Rzeszów is a city located in southeastern Poland. The earliest mention of Jews residing in Rzeszów (known in Yiddish as Rayshe or Reyshe) dates from 1550. At the outbreak of World War II, there were more than 13,000 Jews living in Rzeszów. The Jewish population increased as Jews from Nazi occupied territories were forcibly relocated to the city.

In December of 1941, the Nazis established a ghetto in Rzeszów, where 23,000 Jews were forced to reside. Deportations from Rzeszów began in July of 1942, at which point 2,000 Jews were shot in the forest near Głogów Małopolski and 14,000 were sent to Bełżec. There were several additional deportations throughout the war, with the final liquidation of the ghetto occurring in November 1943.